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Sean Dotson

Sean currently works in the Athletics Compliance Office at Appalachian State University. He graduated from Tulane University School of Law with a certificate in Sports Law in 2012, and graduated from Tulane University with a B.A. in History in 2009. Sean has previously worked with multiple sports agents, and as a law clerk in workers’ compensation court.

WHAT TO DO WITH TRANSFERS

The NCAA, even more than amateurism, has a vice grip on lawsuits involving eligibility, so what is there to be done to reconcile some of the issues that transfer student-athletes face?

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In too Deppe: Antitrust Suit Against NCAA Falls Flat

Last year, Peter Deppe initiated a challenge to the NCAA’s scholarship limits and transfer rules, after failing to transfer and receive an athletics scholarship at a new school. This week, the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana all but shot down Deppe’s case, once again upholding the NCAA rules in face of the Sherman Act.

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SHUT IT DOWN: The Case for the NCAA Death Penalty for Baylor Football

The latest lawsuit against Baylor alleges that due to the school’s laissez-faire policy on punishing football student-athletes for sexual assaults, at least 31 football players were involved in over 50 acts of rape from 2011 to 2015, and goes further to address recruiting improprieties involving the school’s hostess program. If the allegations are proven true, this information should provide the final nail in the coffin for what could be an NCAA “Death Penalty” case against the Baylor football program.

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Much Ado About Nothing: Northwestern’s New NLRB “Decision”

Last month the NLRB issued an advice memorandum concerning the Northwestern football handbook, and the team’s unlawful social media rules. A footnote in the memo assumes for the purposes of the memo that Northwestern’s scholarship football players are employees. This memo was one person assuming an employee status in a limited circumstance, not a reversal of last year’s NLRB ruling, and is still miles away from the NLRB declaring student-athletes to be employees.

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O’Bannon and the NCAA: No Cert for You!

In a relatively unsurprising decision, the Supreme Court has denied petitions for both the NCAA and Ed O’Bannon in one of the landmark cases for the collegiate model. Overall, while both sides petitioned for cert, this is a pretty favorable result for the NCAA.

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How Brexit Could Affect the Premier League and British Players

United Kingdom citizens voted to leave the European Union. With the prospect of leaving the European Economic Area, as well as losing the freedom of movement for workers within the EU, the Premier League could suddenly be on the outside looking in. British leagues and players could be adversely affected by Brexit without some significant legislative changes within the UK, FIFA, and UEFA.

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Why Baylor Will Likely Face NCAA Scrutiny

Following the latest allegations, Baylor University conducted an external review of the institution’s handling of Title IX (and related) issues, which culminated in the release of a very damning report. This Title IX inquiry uncovered flaws in the senior leadership’s actions and Baylor’s student conduct process, and even staff members acting to hinder or discourage reporting acts of sexual assault or dating violence. With apparent involvement from athletics staff members to cover for football players, Baylor could be facing rather significant penalties from the NCAA.

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Dennis Wideman’s Appeal Decision Could Be Worse for the NHL

Independent arbitrator James Oldham reversed Commissioner Gary Bettman’s decision and reduced Dennis Wideman’s suspension to ten games, but only after he had already served 19 games of suspension. While any reversal of the league’s disciplinary decision is nominally a win for the NHLPA and the player, the NHL could have come out much worse.

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The Depth of Deppe’s Case Against the NCAA

After facing an onslaught of litigation on almost every possible amateurism restriction, the NCAA now faces another lawsuit. The newest suit targets restrictions on Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) student-athlete transfers and scholarship limits.

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The NHL’s Somewhat Principled But Flawed Suspension of Dennis Wideman

Dennis Wideman of the Calgary Flames was suspended for 20 games after what looked like a brutal hit on linesman Don Henderson, but only after taking one himself. The NHLPA is set to appeal on his behalf, an appeal that comes down to whether or not a concussed Wideman met the tenets of Rule 40.2 regarding physical abuse of officials.

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