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Sean Dotson

Sean currently works in the Athletics Compliance Office at Appalachian State University. He graduated from Tulane University School of Law with a certificate in Sports Law in 2012, and graduated from Tulane University with a B.A. in History in 2009. Sean has previously worked with multiple sports agents, and as a law clerk in workers’ compensation court.

The Depth of Deppe’s Case Against the NCAA

After facing an onslaught of litigation on almost every possible amateurism restriction, the NCAA now faces another lawsuit. The newest suit targets restrictions on Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) student-athlete transfers and scholarship limits.

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The NHL’s Somewhat Principled But Flawed Suspension of Dennis Wideman

Dennis Wideman of the Calgary Flames was suspended for 20 games after what looked like a brutal hit on linesman Don Henderson, but only after taking one himself. The NHLPA is set to appeal on his behalf, an appeal that comes down to whether or not a concussed Wideman met the tenets of Rule 40.2 regarding physical abuse of officials.

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Real Madrid’s Uphill Battle to Stay in the Copa del Rey Tournament

After being expelled from this year's Copa del Rey for fielding ineligible player Denis Cheryshev, Real Madrid will likely struggle to win an appeal to overthrow the RFEF decision

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How to Fix The NCAA’s Initial Eligibilty Process

Initial eligibility is a good idea in principle that currently faces many flaws. The process is great in hindsight but doesn't allow much time to correct deficiencies, and is especially hard on international prospects. While academic certification is far from perfect for a small number of freshman student-athletes, a few simple changes might make initial eligibility exponentially better.

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What is FIFPro Doing? -From Their Perspective

Yesterday in Belgium, FIFPro, the world football (soccer) players’ union, filed a competition law complaint with the Directorate General Competition of the European Commission against FIFA in an attempt to challenge the movement of players.[i] FIFPro is denouncing the Regulations on the Status and Transfer of Players (RSTP) as anti-competitive and illegal, preventing smaller clubs from competing, limiting player rights, and failing the future growth and success of the sport.

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Punting or Prudence: The NLRB Decision on Northwestern

On Monday, August 17, 2015, the National Labor Relations Board ruled against Northwestern football players on athletic scholarship, preventing them from forming a union. First, this decision did not rule as to whether or not they considered the student-athletes employees. What the NLRB decided is that it would decline jurisdiction on the matter, for not falling within the confines of the National Labor Relations Act.

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Barcelona’s Two-Window Registration Embargo

After Barcelona has completed the signing of two players this summer, you may be asking yourself how transfers can happen into a club while it is under a transfer ban. The real ban isn’t from bringing in new players, but in the ability to register them as an active member of the team and have them eligible to participate in competitive matches.

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The Enterprise: FIFA’s Rampant Corruption Exposed

Following an extensive investigation, the United States Department of Justice indicted fourteen individuals from FIFA and sports marketing companies on charges of racketeering, wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies, and other related offenses. These individuals were all high-ranking officials and executives who participated in two decades of bribery and kickbacks, turning FIFA into a criminal enterprise for their own gain.

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The NCAA’s Ill-Defined Role in Academic Fraud Cases

Academic misconduct in the NCAA has become a bit of a hot button issue in the last decade, as the NCAA is categorizing academic improprieties as an impermissible extra benefit. When looking at academic fraud involving NCAA student-athletes, the million-dollar question is “What should the NCAA’s role be in assessing and punishing academic fraud?”

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SILAS NACITA: WHEN ELIGIBILITY DECISIONS BREAK SOCIAL MEDIA

Today, the NCAA “declared” a Baylor football player ineligible for accepting housing, or at least that’s what was initially reported. After some time couch surfing and failing to find a concrete home, a concerned friend offered to help by providing an apartment. This provided apartment became the center of allegations of extra benefits. But is there more to the story?

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