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Legal news and analysis of professional baseball

Nobody Puts Bryant in the Minors! Except for Mr. Epstein…

Kris Bryant of the Chicago Cubs had a stellar spring training. Bryant should be a shoe-in for the Cubs’ major league 25-man roster come opening day, right? If you've been paying attention to any major sports news outlet, you know that's not the case. This past Monday, March 30, the Cubs reassigned Bryant to their minor league camp, meaning that the number two prospect in all of baseball will start the season in the minor leagues. Why?

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The Final Fight at the Friendly Confines?

It finally happened. After beating around the bush for years – including multiple lawsuits against the City of Chicago and the Commission on Chicago Landmarks – a group of owners that operate the rooftop seating clubs on the buildings behind Wrigley Field sued the Chicago Cubs and chairman Tim Rickets in the Northern District of Illinois. The Rooftop Owners allege a number of claims stemming from the Cubs’ ongoing, Wrigley Field “expansion” project.

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The Emergence of the Qualifying Offer as a Legitimate Roster Building Tool and Salary Constraint

As Spring Training approaches another high profile free agent – Kansas City Royals pitcher James Shields – finds himself without a contract. Whether Shields has fallen victim to his age (33) or failure to live up to his “Big Game” James moniker there is no doubt that the Qualifying Offer made by the Kansas City Royals has affected his status on the open market.

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MASCOT WARS: CUBS RESOLVE TRADEMARK DISPUTE WITH ‘BILLY CUB’ FOIL

On July 18, the Cubs filed suit against a group of people they claim to have been dressing in a bogus mascot costume and participating in “inappropriate and unsavory actions” near Wrigley Field, including charging fans for pictures and instigating bar fights. In a federal court ruling dated September 29, the Cubs and the Weiers reached a settlement of their dispute.

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The Genius in Yoenis Cespedes’s Contract

An explanation of how Yoenis Cespedes is getting out of the last two years of team control under the Reserve System

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Should Mr. Met be Replaced by Sexual Harassment Panda? A Look at the Legal Framework Surrounding the Allegations Levied Against the Mets and Jeff Wilpon.

On Wednesday, September 10, 2014, Leigh Castergine filed a complaint against the New York Mets and Jeffrey Wilpon in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York claiming Wilpon and the Mets discriminated against her on the basis of sex, pregnancy, and familial status. This news was essentially buried under a news day involving new Ray Rice video footage and talking heads trying to determine whether or not Danny Ferry is just a little bit racist or racist enough to be fired for his comments regarding Luol Deng. This article will attempt to shed more light on an intriguing news story which was essentially skipped over.

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The Unfriendly Confines: Rooftop Owners Sue the City of Chicago and Commission on Chicago Landmarks over Wrigley Field Renovation Project

After months, if not years, of posturing, the owners of the rooftop buildings standing tall behind the cozy confines of Wrigley Field finally filed suit to prevent the Chicago Cubs from breaking ground on their long-anticipated expansion project. But, the rooftop owners are going about it in a wholly unexpected way.

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King of the Jungle, or at least the Trade Deadline

Why the Detroit Tigers are the winners of this year’s MLB Non-Waiver Trade Deadline, and General Manager Dave Dombrowski is the most adept baseball executive in putting together a deal

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Drafting Tommy John

There has been a rash of Tommy John surgeries in Major League Baseball this year. What do teams need to consider when drafting a collegiate or high school pitcher who has torn his UCL?

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Down in Front! Chicago Cubs Threaten to Block the View From Nearby Rooftops

Ever since Wrigley Field opened in 1914 folks have tried to get a peek inside the ivy-covered walls for free. The owners of rooftops behind the stadium’s outfield capitalized on that, selling tickets to rooftop stadium boxes with the enticement of unobstructed views into the Friendly Confines during Chicago Cubs’ home games. In 2002, that all changed. “The free ride is over,” said Andy MacPhail, the Cubs former president and CEO. “The rooftop owners take in as much as $10 million a year by selling seats to view our games. We do not believe the rooftop operators are entitled to profit from our names, our players, trademarks, copyrighted telecasts and images without our consent.”

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