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Tag Archives: O’Bannon

The Great Escape: The NCAA Receives a Tremendous Ruling for Now and The Future in The O’Bannon Appeal Decision

On Wednesday, September 30, 2015, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion on the NCAA’s appeal of O’Bannon vs. NCAA. The decision was a massive win for the NCAA, and for a number of reasons, the decision was a massive defeat for proponents seeking increased compensation for student athletes.

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Sports Law Links

Each week The Sports Esquires keep track of the sports law headlines so you don’t have to. This week’s edition features another Deflategate omnibus, the NHL broadcast settlement, and a host of NCAA issues.

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Sports Law Links

Each week The Sports Esquires keep track of the sports law headlines so you don’t have to. This week’s edition highlights the ongoing FIFA scandal and Sepp Blatter’s resignation, the UNC academic fraud allegations, and Tom Benson’s mental competency trial.

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Sports Law Links

Each week The Sports Esquires keep track of the sports law headlines so you don’t have to. This week’s edition covers the stunning FIFA indictments and arrests, Greg Hardy’s suspension, and introduces some new sports law scholarship.

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Sports Law Links

Each week The Sports Esquires keep track of the sports law headlines, so you don’t have to. The NFL season may be over, but the league’s sports law issues are not. Enjoy our post-Super Bowl edition of Sports Law Links.

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Sports Law Links

As usual, NFL scandals dominate the sports law world. But don’t miss the fascinating soccer stories and in-depth coverage of match-fixing issues in this week’s edition of Sports Law Links.

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Sports Law Links

It has been a busy couple of weeks in the world of sports law. The Sports Esquires rounds up the top stories in sports law as part of our effort to keep you informed about all that is happening behind the scenes of your favorite leagues and teams.

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The Curious Case of Ed O’Bannon: How the NCAA Managed to Lose Almost Every Point in the Landmark Case and Still Avoid Having to Make Any Sweeping Changes.

On Friday, August 8, the first decision in a wave of litigation against the NCAA hit the shores. The decision by Judge Claudia Wilken of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California is both important and intriguing. The decision is the first time in major litigation that a court has not given deference to the NCAA’s commitment to amateurism when those regulations seem to conflict with antitrust laws. The decision has been hailed by many as “the death of amateurism;” however, a close analysis will show that statement to be a minor exaggeration. In reality, it will merely force the NCAA to make better and more reasoned arguments for what it does.

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Dr. Enforcement: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love NCAA Interpretive Flexibility

The NCAA announced a new interpretive philosophy. If this philosophy works, everyone wins. Student-athletes will likely receive more minimal participation benefits without having to pay back paltry amounts. Compliance offices can actually say yes to coaches and staff members more often, without the NCAA second-guessing the institution. Lastly, the NCAA’s small and overburdened enforcement staff can relax in the knowledge that they will see less violations (stupid or just minimal) cross their desks. But if the philosophy doesn’t work, the NCAA could devolve into interpretive chaos, and just become another thorn in the organization’s side.

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Could the NCAA Lose Its Tax-Exempt Status?

Football players at Northwestern have cast their union votes. Beyond the outcome of that vote, much uncertainty remains. If the status of scholarship athletes as employees is confirmed on appeal, what does it do to their status as amateur athletes? For student athletes who choose to unionize, what additional benefits/compensation will they seek, and what effect with that have on their amateur statuses? And what effect will these developments have on the tax-exempt status of the NCAA and its member institutions? As you’ll see, the answer to these questions may all be up to the NCAA itself.

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