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Tag Archives: NFL

Sports Law Link

Once again we’ve got you covered for your holiday sports law reading. All of us here at The Sports Esquires wish you a happy New Year. Don’t forget to subscribe to get the Sports Law Links as a weekly newsletter in your inbox in 2015.

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Sports Law Links

The holidays are a great time to catch up on what’s going on in the sports law world. The Sports Esquires wish you all a happy holiday season.

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Sports Law Links

Each week, the Sports Esquires round up the top stories to keep you informed about the world of sports law. Here’s what happened last week in the world of sports law:

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Sports Law Links

Each week, the Sports Esquires round up the top stories to keep you informed about the world of sports law. Here’s what happened last week in the world of sports law: NFL A quick recap of some of the league’s biggest legal issues. More in-depth stories below. Adrian Peterson pleaded …

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Sports Law Links

Each week, the Sports Esquires round up the top stories to keep you informed about the world of sports law. Here's what happened last week in the world of sports law:

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Sports Law Links

Each week, The Sports Esquires round up the top stories in sports law to keep you informed about what’s happening behind the scenes with players, teams, and leagues.

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The NFL Is Still Safe At Home

The FCC’s repeal of its Sports Blackout Rules was merely grandstanding and has no tangible effect. However, it does signal a public recognition that the four major sports leagues –primarily the NFL because it benefits the most from blackout – no longer need a government crutch to operate and remain profitable. The only way real progress could be made on this issue is if Congress repealed the antitrust immunity granted to home blackouts. Then and only then would the NFL and its broadcast partners alter the current blackout policy in order to avoid the black cloud of treble damages an antitrust suit brought by fans, bars, local networks, and advertisers alike would bring.

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Breaking Down Ray Rice’s Appeal: He Will Win, The Internet May Break

How this appeal plays out will have a big impact on the upcoming revamped NFL Personal Conduct Policy. In fact, the appeal has already impacted how the NFL handles disciplining players for off-field misconduct. Adrian Peterson and Greg Hardy were placed on the Commissioner’s Exemption List and likely told that such action does not constitute final discipline. Had the NFL done otherwise, it would be prevented from imposing further discipline in the form of fines or suspensions once the criminal cases are finalized.

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Jerry Jones Sued for Sexual Assault by Former Exotic Dancer who Took Photos of Cowboys Owner…and That’s Only Part of the Story

On September 8, 2014, a former exotic dancer named Jana Weckerly filed a civil suit in the 134th District Court in Dallas County, Texas against Jerry Jones and the Dallas Cowboys. In detail that borders on graphic for a legal document, Weckerly alleges in her suit that Jerry Jones touched Weckerley’s genitals, fondled her breasts, forced her to touch or rub his penis, and forced her to watch while Jones received oral sex from another woman. In case you forgot, it's been a rough couple of weeks for the NFL off the field. Ray Rice...Greg Hardy...Adrian Peterson...all being accused of doing some pretty awful stuff. Amidst the evidence of beating women and whipping children, Weckerly’s allegations against Jones and the Cowboys have largely slipped from the headlines. Maybe that's because the allegations against Jones don't affect fantasy football owners all over the country, or because these allegations are civil rather than criminal. Whatever the reason, this is a saga that is definitely worth following.

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It’s Better to Be Right Than First: Why the Commissioner’s Exemption List is a Bad Idea

Here’s the thing about the Peterson situation: the only place he’s been convicted is in the Court of Public Opinion. In its rush to serve up its own form of vigilante pseudo-justice in the wake of intense media and public scrutiny, the Vikings and the NFL seem to have forgotten one of the basic tenets of the legal system: it’s better to be right, than first.

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